• Date
    20-22 Octobre, 2016
  • Location
    Hamilton, ON
  • Tickets
    Prix réduit jusqu'au 20 juin
  • Speakers
    À venir!
20-22
Oct 2016
National Trust Conference 2016
Heritage Rising
Hamilton Convention Centre, Ontario
20
Oct
ABOUT

National Trust Conference 2016
in association with the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals

 

Heritage places are rising stars. They have an authenticity and vibrancy that can’t be purchased off-the-rack and they sit at the intersection of defining issues of our time – how to live sustainably and equitably.

National Trust Conference 2016, Heritage Rising, is inspired by Hamilton, a resilient city with an exceptional heritage legacy that has bounced back from the decline of its industrial sector. It now boasts one of Canada’s fastest growing economies. Propelled by a growing creative sector and a blend of grassroots and public projects, heritage-led regeneration is transforming the city’s urban fabric and creating a dynamic new civic identity.

Heritage Rising will explore the cutting-edge of heritage thought and practice, in Canada and abroad, including Indigenous heritage, rural revitalization and climate change. It will also build on Hamilton’s experience to examine how heritage reflects cultural diversity and contributes to social goals like poverty reduction, food security and public health.

The annual National Trust Conference is Canada’s largest event for professionals, practitioners and volunteers engaged in regenerating and saving our heritage places. The 500-plus participants expected at Heritage Rising will come from a diverse range of backgrounds: architects, professionals and trades; planners and government representatives; heritage organizations, volunteers and the general public; and university instructors and students.

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Conference Hotel

All our attendees can reserve online at the special rate of $159.00 (plus tax) by clicking here.

Reservations can also be made by contacting the 24 hour, toll-free reservations line at 1-888-627-8161 and asking for the National Trust for Canada group block.

Note: The Sheraton Hotel offers self-parking for $10.99 per day, plus applicable taxes.

Travel Discounts

The National Trust for Canada has partnered with Corporate Traveller to offer discounts, where available, for Heritage Rising. Please contact our dedicated account manager below for any travel bookings or information you require.

Shannon Malcolm
(613) 236 2444

Corporate Traveller

Pearson Airport Shuttle

hp-van-planeAirways Transit is proud to offer The National Trust Conference 2016 delegates a discounted, single passenger conference fare of $48.67 plus HST for one way transportation between Toronto Pearson Airport and Hamilton.

If two or more delegates are travelling together on the same reservation, group fares will be applied and noted in your confirmation.

Book online with code NTC2016. Reservations must be made in advance to qualify for the discounted fare.

Planes, Trains & Automobiles

Hamilton is within easy reach of Toronto and other destinations in Southern Ontario.

Hamilton International Airport

A number of airlines flying directly to Hamilton.

  • Westjet – Flights from Calgary
  • Air Canada – Flights from Montreal and Halifax
  • NewLeaf – Routes to be announced

Bus and Train from Toronto

Parking

The Sheraton Hamilton, our conference hotel, has self-parking available for $10.99 per day plus tax.

SCHEDULE

  • October 19
    Day 1
  • October 20
    Day 2
  • October 21
    Day 3
  • October 22
    Day 4
  • October 23
    Day 5
  • Workshops
  • Indigenous Heritage Roundtable
PlenaryIcon
9:00 am – 12:00 pm Building Strength: Regenerating Places of Faith
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Places of faith anchor and shape our communities. Yet many congregations are facing declining attendance and insufficient funding to maintain and operate their historic buildings. These important community assets are in a period of transition across the country, and the Hamilton Region is no exception. What is their future? Read more.

Price


If registered for the Conference : $75

If not registered for the Conference : $100 *choose registrant type Tours and Workshops only

Register Now

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1:30 pm – 5:00 pm Punching Above Your Weight: Fundraising for a Small Shop
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Non-profits are under pressure to achieve increasing fundraising goals with limited resources in a sector where competition for donations is fierce. In this workshop learn how to make effective use of your resources to expand your audiences, attract new donors, and take advantage of evolving fundraising trends. Read more.

Price



If registered for the Conference : $75

If not registered for the Conference : $100 *choose registrant type Tours and Workshops only

Register Now

PlenaryIcon
9:00 am – 5:30 pm Going Beyond Consultation: Navigating Worldviews in the Search for Meaningful Engagement
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In October 2015, Moh-Kins-Tsis, the Calgary Indigenous Heritage Roundtable, brought together professionals and community members to understand how Indigenous and non-Indigenous protocols for protecting heritage places could be aligned. The Hamilton Indigenous Heritage Roundtable 2016, Going Beyond Consultation, will build on this momentum by drawing on Ontario case studies to understand how true relationships are built and nourished over time.

 

Agenda

Click here to view the agenda.
 

Price

If registered for the Conference: $100
If not registered for the Conference: $125 *choose registrant type Tours and Workshops only
 

Register

  • Workshops
  • Tours
  • Meetings
  • Special Events
PlenaryIcon
9:00 am - 3:30 pm Mighty Sites: Regenerating Historic Sites
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Many historic sites open to the public are at a cross roads, faced with limited government funding, major capital costs and increased competition from more dynamic attractions. They must re-invent themselves or face a continued decline. Groups trying to save a beloved historic place at risk by opening it to the public are faced with an uphill battle to convince potential partners of its viability. Read more

Price


If registered for the Conference : $100

If not registered for the Conference : $125 *choose registrant type Tours and Workshops only

Register Now

MainStreetIcon
9:00 am – 4:00 pm Downtowns Rising: Creative Solutions to Save Downtowns
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Downtowns Rising will draw on expertise and case examples from Hamilton, and North America, inspiring participants to imagine what is possible and arming them with creative solutions and best practices for downtown revitalization. The day will combine inspired plenary presentations, with a series of mobile workshops. Read more.Keynote speaker Matthew Wagner, Vice President, National Main Street Center, U.S National Trust for Historic Preservation will present at noon.

Price

If registered for the Conference : $75If not registered for the Conference : $95 *choose registrant type Tours and Workshops onlyTo attend Keynote Luncheon only: $30 *choose registrant type Tours and Workshops only

Register now

PlenaryIcon
9:00 am – 4:00 pm Conservation of Metal Finishes in Modern Architecture
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Who Should Attend?

Professionals, consultants and others interested in the conservation of heritage materials. Workshop Description:The analysis and restoration of original decorative finishes on modern architectural metals is not always well understood. As a result, such testing or treatment is less well integrated into regular preservation practice than that of other materials and finishes, particularly those in architectural contexts such as decorative painting or plasterwork. Decorative metal finishes may be microscopically thin and fleeting, and they do not typically accumulate in a series of strata that can be sampled and studied through traditional optical microscopy. There are many reasons why the evidence of a decorative metal finish is often difficult to characterize. These might include: -its likelihood of being severely degraded or altered through exposure, oxidation and wear; -the difficulty of discerning an intentional patina from incidental corrosion products; -the chance that the original scheme may have been intentionally removed.

The instructors have developed a framework of research, investigation and implementation that has resulted in the successful investigation and restoration of significant and complex finishes. This workshop presents an introductory approach to understanding, identifying, investigating and restoring original decorative architectural metal finishes. It includes case studies of successfully completed projects. It will also demonstrate how a variety of instruments from the small and relatively inexpensive (ultrasonic thickness gauge) to the large and highly sophisticated (x-ray fluorescence) can be used to help characterize both the nature and the relative condition of these finishes and their substrates. Additionally, there will be a hands-on workshop which will demonstrate different cleaning methods and materials that are available to the user. These will include, but are not limited to: laser, CO2, water jetting and other forms of abrasive techniques. If time permits, the application of different aesthetic surface treatments and protective coatings will be demonstrated.

Learning objectives

  1. To understand the general history and technology of how complex decorative metal finishes —such as patinas, gilding and plating — are applied or developed
  2. To understand the deterioration mechanisms that affect these finishes and the implications for their preservation.
  3. To understand the range of instruments available to help characterize the nature and condition of these decorative finishes and their host metals
  4. To understand the different cleaning techniques that are available for the treatment of decorative metals and how these impact the surface finish and substrate.
  5. To understand how different aesthetic surface treatments and protective coatings are applied to decorative metals and the impact theve on the care and maintenance of these materials.

Agenda

8:00 - 8:30 am   Registration at Mattawa Industries 1632 Burlington St. E, Hamilton ON

8:30 - 9:00 am  Welcome & Introduction

Presenter introductions, sponsor acknowledgements, learning objectives and introduction to the workshop.

9:00 - 9:50 am  Understanding Decorative Metals Finishes in Architectural Applications

An overview of the types of decorative metals and their history of use in architecture. Factors of corrosion resistance, strength and beauty as well as technical advances in mining, refining and alloying influenced the development and introduction of metals. We will review the general applications and their associated periods of use for diverse metals. The use of coatings on metals will also be reviewed. Tools to assist in identifying them in architectural setting, including non-destructive testing both simple and sophisticated and other means will be reviewed. Risk factors and counter-indications for cleaning different types of metals - such as hardness or chemical interactions - will be discussed, as well as available test methods for substrates and their potential benefits to developing a cleaning program. Means of learning from even deteriorated finishes will be reviewed as needed to determine the original finish scheme.

 9:50 - 10:40 am Types of Original Finishes and Their Deterioration

The appropriateness and efficacy of different cleaning, restoration, and coating methods are directly related to the type of soiling and deterioration to be mitigated or removed. This presentation will review the nature of different types of corrosion and degradation of architectural metals, their causes and how to determine a treatment scope that will reverse the deterioration and recreate the original finish. The means of preserving the newly restored surfaces and appropriateness of different coating systems will be reviewed.

10:40 - 11:00 am   Break

11:00 - 11:50 am   Cleaning Methods

An overview of currently available cleaning methods, how they work, and their suitability and risks for different substrates and soiling. Methods to be presented include: Water - misting, low and medium pressure, hot water/steam, detergents; Chemical - acidic, alkaline, chelating agents, solvents, and poultice methods; Mechanical - dry, hand tool methods, and wet and dry micro-abrasive systems; CO2 blasting, and Laser ablation. New developments in research and/or trials on metals cleaning will also be discussed. 

12:00 - 1:00 pm Lunch (box lunch provided)

1:00 - 1:30 pm  Restoration Parameters and Protocols This presentation looks into a number of parameters that surround and affect decisions on refinishing. These include aligning the goals of treatment with those techniques that can be applied in the field versus shop or factory, the ethics of  with expectations, who makes decisions and when, applicable standards, methods of specifying cleaning, developing a cleaning plan, and field considerations such as sequence of work, environment conditions, protection, and field testing and mock ups. Coatings selection will again be reviewed in this context.

1:30 - 4:00 pm   Demonstrations Attendees will rotate through demonstrations of various cleaning methods by experienced contractors. Most demonstrations will be performed on the actual masonry of the church building. Demonstrations will include the following categories of cleaning methods:

Waterjetting

Chemical methods
  • Micro-abrasive methods
  • CO2 blasting methods
  • Laser ablation methods
  • Patination
  • Brush plating
  • Coatings and corrosion inhibitors

4:00- 4:30 pm   Q&A Panel Discussion

Workshop Leaders

Joe Sembrat (Senior Executive Vice President & Senior Conservator, Conservation Solutions Inc.)

Mark Rabinowitz (Executive Vice President, Conservation Solutions Inc.)

Justine Posluszny Bello (Vice President of Operations, Conservation Solutions Inc.)

Kelly Caldwell (Conservator, Conservation Solutions Inc.)

Kelly Caldwell, CSI Conservation Solutions ULC (CSI) – Kelly is a fully qualified conservation professional who has been working and volunteering in the fields of archaeology and conservation for over ten years with a key focus in archaeological contexts.  Upon completion of her graduate training, Kelly supplemented her continued fieldwork with additional experience at the British Museum where she focused on inorganic materials, including stone, wall

Kevin McSwain (Mattawa Industrial Services Inc.)

Price

If registered for the Conference : $100

If not registered for the Conference : $125 * choose registrant type Tours and Workshops only

ToursIcon
9:00 am – 12:00 pm Hamilton’s Black History
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Bus Tour

Leader: Adrienne Shadd (Research, Curator and Author of We’re Rooted Here and They Can’t Pull Us Up: Essays in African Canadian Women’s History)

Adrienne Shadd Research, Curator and Author of We’re Rooted Here and They Can’t Pull Us Up: Essays in African Canadian Women’s History President, Heritage Hamilton Foundation Senior Project Manager, Heritage Facilities and Capita Planning, City of Hamilton Explore the extraordinary history of Hamilton’s Black community. This tour will include a visit to Griffin House National Historic Site and to the Auchmar Estate.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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9.30am -11.30am Hamilton’s Core: 200 Years in the Making
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Walking tour

Leader: Barbara Murray (President, ACO Hamilton)
Discover the continuous evolution of Hamilton’s downtown core on a fast paced walk of George Hamilton’s 1816 town plan, Hamilton’s early industrial heritage, railway and sixties-seventies developments and recent rehabilitation and adaptive re-use projects.  Threats and successes on City Hall, Lister Block, Tivoli Theatre and the jaw dropping Gore Park streetwall will be discussed from the perspective of a former long-time heritage permit committee citizen volunteer.  You’ll see Hamilton’s series of federal/dominion public buildings, the former Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Headquarters, courthouses, Victoria (NHS) and Treble Halls.  Note this tour includes a lot of stairs.Price – $10 if registered for the Conference

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9:00 am – 12:00 pm Indigenous Heritage in Hamilton
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Bus TourHamilton has a rich Indigenous heritage with many places of sacred and cultural significance. This tour will explore a variety of sites such as the Paleo-Indian (ca 12000 BP) Mount Albion West site, a rich legacy of sites in the Red Hill Valley including two Middle/Transitional Woodland sites, and the ancestral Neutral site in the valley (ca AD 1350) at Kings Forest Park.

Leaders: Robert MacDonald (Senior Archaeologist & Assistant Managing Partner, ASI) & Carolyn King (Former Chief, Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation

 

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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9:00 am – 12:00 pm Hamilton: The City Beautiful
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Bus Tour

Leaders: Megan Hobson (Architectural Historian/Conservation Specialist) and Robert Hamilton (Chair, Hamilton Historical Board)



This tour explores the major City Beautiful projects undertaken in the early 20th century that transformed the North-West Entrance to the City of Hamilton and created large scale public gardens and spacious new residential suburbs in the east end. Highlights include a guided tour of the newly renovated Rock Garden at the Royal Botanical Gardens, the Memorial Garden, a little-known garden ruin designed by the Dunington-Grubbs, the High Level Bridge, Gage Park fountain, designed by John M. Lyle, and the St. Clair Boulevard Heritage Conservation District.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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9:00 am – 12:00 pm War of 1812
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Bus Tour

Leader: Robin McKee (Historian & Principal, Historical Perceptions, Vice-Chair, Hamilton Historical Board)



When is a cemetery not a cemetery? When is a city not a city? In history! Find out about the events of the War of 1812 in the Hamilton area, the Fort at Burlington Heights, its defensive positions and the Hamilton veterans from that war! When is a castle not a castle? When it’s in Hamilton! Visit Dundurn Castle and the Hamilton Military Museum pertaining to the War of 1812.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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9:30 am – 11:30 am Urban Renewal in Hamilton
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Walking Tour

Leader: Thomas Allen (Architectural Journalist, Rebuild Hamilton)



Led by local architectural journalist Thomas Allen, this tour will take you around the downtown core, starting at City Hall, to look at the urban renewal projects and architecture of the late ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s that drastically altered Hamilton’s cityscape. From urban malls to brutalist architecture and modern planning, the tour will include insight about the architects, politicians and planners who changed the urban fabric for better or for worse.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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1:30 pm – 4:30 pm Westdale Garden-City Suburb and the Historic Village of Dundas
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Bus Tour

Leaders: Megan Hobson (Architectural Historian/Conservation Specialist) & Ann Gillespie (Principal, Gillespie Heritage Consulting)



This tour will include the historic village of Dundas that is now part of the amalgamated City of Hamilton and Westdale, a garden-city suburb laid out in 1917 as the city expanded westward. The Westdale neighbourhood includes a distinctive oval street layout with a central commercial area surrounded by Arts & Crafts style residences backing onto the city’s largest park, a natural ravine system, Cootes Paradise and the McMaster University campus.

Located at the base of the Escarpment at the mouth of the Desjardins Canal, the “Valley Town” of Dundas was an important milling and industrial town in the early 19th century. Sites include the remarkably intact historic main street, the Cross-Melville Heritage District and 19th century industrial buildings that have been adapted for new uses. Highlights include the Dundas District Lofts, a Collegiate Gothic high school converted to residential lofts, and the Shed Brewing Co., a former skating rink converted to a micro-brewery.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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1:30 pm – 4:30 pm Six Nations and the Mohawk Institute
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Bus Tour

Leaders: Paul General (Wildlife Manager, Six Nations Lands & Resources) & Paula Whitlow (Museum Director, Woodland Cultural Centre)



Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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1:30 pm – 4:30 pm The Mountain: Auchmar, Century Manor & the Balfour Estate
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Bus Tour

Leaders: Diane G. Dent (President, Heritage Hamilton Foundation) & Carolyn Samko (Senior Project Manager, Heritage Facilities and Capital Planning, City of Hamilton)



Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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1:30 pm – 4:30 pm Made In Hamilton: Industrial Heritage of a Great Canadian Steel Town
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Bus Tour

Leader: TBA



This tour explores the rich industrial heritage of Hamilton and some of the creative re-purposing of former industrial buildings that have occurred in recent years. Known in the 19th century as the Birmingham of Canada and in the 20th century as the Electric City, this tour will show how the “Ambitious City” located at the Head-of the-Lake became an industrial powerhouse. Highlights include a guided tour of the Cotton Factory, a 19th century garment factory on Sherman Avenue North that has been re-purposed as Hamilton’s largest creative arts facility.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Walking the Durand: From Hamilton’s Stone Age to the Mansions at the Escarpment’s Edge
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Walking Tour

Leaders: Nicholas Kevlahan & Ned Nolan (Durand Neighbourhood Association)

Led by local residents Nicholas Kevlahan and Ned Nolan, this tour will take you from the downtown core to the edge of Hamilton's escarpment. It will also travel through time, from Hamilton's 1850s-1860s "stone age" of buildings constructed from locally quarried whirlpool sandstone and dolomite, to the impressive brick mansions built just under the escarpment by Hamilton's captains of industry in the 1890s and early 1900s. On the way back down you will pass the many high-rise apartment buildings that began to replace the Victorian neighbourhood in the 1960s and 1970s until the neighbours organized to resist further demolitions.The walk will take in two designated heritage districts, a national historic site, the first graded public school in Ontario and work by notable local architects John Lyle and James Balfour.$10 if registered for the Conference

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2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Adaptive Reuse in the Core: Meet the Architects
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Walking Tour

Leader: Rebecca Beatty (Principal, Rebecca Beatty Architect & Past Vice Chair, Hamilton Burlington Society of Architects)



This walking tour will explore a number of downtown adaptive reuse projects which have utilized existing structures and repurposed them for a new function. The tour will be led by local architect, Rebecca Beatty. Each site visited will have a representative from the architectural firm responsible for the project for an in-depth discussion. The sites which will be toured are: Witton Lofts, by Lintack Architects Incorporated, the offices of local architect Their + Curran Architects Inc. and 95 King St. East, a mixed use project, also by TCA. Additional sites may be added.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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2:00 pm – 4:00 pm From Worker to Hipster: A Walking Tour of the North End
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Walking Tour

Leaders: Sonia Mrva (Curator, City of Hamilton) & Christopher Redford (Heritage Presentation Coordinator, City of Hamilton)

Sonia Mrva, Curator, Heritage Projects, City of Hamilton – Sonia is responsible for the management of cultural heritage resources for the City of Hamilton. Her prior work includes Curatorial roles at two of Hamilton’s prominent National Historic Sites. Sonia has a Bachelor of Arts, History and has completed post graduate work in Museum Studies and Cultural Management. Throughout Hamilton’s history, waves of newcomers have added layers to the history and culture of the city. Settling in areas where work and affordable housing were available, immigrants shaped the landscape of North Hamilton in particular. Community organizations and religious institutions were established to support the needs of these communities. “Worker” housing was built to provide immigrants with homes close to the mills and factories. Centers of entertainment, education and dining were tailored to the newly arrived. Join Sonia Mrva and Christopher Redford from the Heritage Resource Management section of the City of Hamilton as they lead participants through a rapidly re-developing portion of the north end of the City, where a historical tapestry of immigration, settlement, labour and industry can still be explored through stories and architecture.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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2:00 pm – 4:00 pm This Ain’t Hollywood: Music in the Hammer
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Walking Tour

Leader: TBA



This tour will explore the music heritage of the Hammer; from performances by world-class jazz musicians and singers in the Ball Room of the Royal Connaught Hotel to the riotous antics of Hamilton punk bands Teenage Head, nicknamed the ‘Ramones of Canada,’ and the Forgotten Rebels in the 1970s, right up to the vibrant and diverse alternative music scene today.

Learn about local legends, iconic music venues and outdoor music festivals such as Festival of Friends, the Harvest Festival and Supercrawl. Highlights include a tour of the Grant Avenue Studio, a modest Edwardian home converted to a recording studio in the 1970s by Bod Doidge and the Lanois brothers, where artists such as U2, Gordon Lightfoot, Bob Dylan, Ani Difranco, Bruce Cockburn and Johnny Cash have recorded.

Price

$10 if registered for the Conference

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2:00 pm – 4:00 pm King Street East
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Walking Tour

Leader: Barbara Murray (President, ACO Hamilton)

Join an eclectic tour of Hamilton’s east downtown core, from its roots as an indigenous trail, early commercial support centre for current and long gone railways, one time and re-emerging “theatre district” and major transportation corridors.  You will see Hamilton’s first and subsequent heritage façade improvement projects, adaptively re-used industrial buildings and theatres, intact residential areas and the innovative for its time, First Place Hamilton.  Joseph Connolly’s work in Hamilton will be discussed at St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church, home to Hamilton’s only “homeless Jesus”.  Ghost signs, railway themed public art and a refurbished mid-century gas bar round out this overview.Price – $10 if registered for the Conference

PlenaryIcon
8:00 am – 4:00 pm National Council Meeting

National Council Meeting

Location: Art Gallery of Hamilton (123 King Street West), Jean and Ross Fischer Gallery

By Invitation.

Leaders of province-wide heritage organizations from across Canada meet to discuss common issues and strategies.

For more information: Natalie Bull nbull@nationaltrustcanada.ca

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8:00 am – 12:00 pm Student Symposium

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12:00 pm – 5:00 pm National Roundtable on Heritage Education

Heritage academics and students meet to discuss issues relevant to heritage education and training in Canada.

Convention Centre, Room 314

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5:00pm – 6:30pm Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals Annual General Meeting
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Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals Annual General Meeting

Location: Room 314, Hamilton Convention Centre5

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6:00 pm – 7:30 pm Sponsor Appreciation Cocktail
Liuna Station

Keynote-Icon
7:30 pm – 9:00 pm Keynote Address
Liuna Station

Keynote Address

Location: Liuna Station (360 James Street, N.) Grand Central Ballroom

Walking: Liuna Station is a 20 minute walk north on historic James Street North. Window shop along the way!

Shuttle Bus: A shuttle bus to LIUNA Station will depart the Hamilton Convention Centre (1 Summers Lane) every 15-20 minutes from 6:00- 7:30pm.

Ry Moran (Director, National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, Winnipeg, MB) Ry Moran is the first Director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR). In this role, it is Ry Moran’s job to guide the creation of an enduring national treasure – a dynamic Indigenous archive built on integrity, trust and dignity. Ry came to the centre directly from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). On the TRC’s behalf, he facilitated the gathering of nearly 7,000 video/audio-recorded statements of former residential school students and others affected by the residential school system. He was also responsible for gathering the documentary history of the residential school system from more than 20 government departments and nearly 100 church archives – millions of records in all. Before joining the TRC, Ry was the founder and president of YellowTilt Productions, which delivered services in a variety of areas including Aboriginal language presentation and oral history. He has hosted internationally broadcast television programs, produced national cultural events, and written and produced original music for children’s television. Ry’s professional skills and creativity have earned him many awards, including a National Aboriginal Role Model Award, and a Canadian Aboriginal Music Award. Ry is a proud member of the Metis Nation.

Opening-Icon
9:00 pm – 10:00 pm Opening Reception
Liuna Station

  • Morning Sessions
  • Afternoon Sessions
  • Special Events
SpeechIcon
8:30 am – 10:00 am Plenary Session – Big Bang: Heritage in an Expanding Universe
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Speakers

Nina Chapple & Megan Hobson - A Brief History of Hamilton

After graduating from Harvard (M.A.) Nina Chapple joined the City of Boston on the its first architectural inventory and Back Bay HCD. When the OHA was passed (1975), Nina became Senior Heritage Planner for Hamilton, working together with LACAC, staff and Council to establish the foundation of today's Heritage Conservation Programme.

Megan Hobson, MA, Dipl. HC – A graduate of the University of Toronto and the Willowbank School of Restoration Arts, Megan is an architectural historian and conservation specialist. She has a heritage consulting practice based in Dundas, Ontario and is an adjunct faculty member of the Willowbank School in Queenston, Ontario.

Rodney Harrison (UCL, London, UK) Rodney Harrison is Professor of Heritage Studies at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and AHRC Priority Area Leadership Fellow for Heritage. He has a broad range of experience teaching, researching and working across both natural and cultural heritage. He is currently principal investigator of the collaborative, interdisciplinary Heritage Futures research programme.

Franklin Vagnone (Twisted Preservation, New York City, USA) Franklin Vagnone is a Public Historian who has been labeled a "domestic-archeo-anthropologist”. Franklin maintains the blog: Twisted Preservation, and the series “One Night Stand” overnights in historic house museums, and “Water Cooler Chats”, which to date, has readers in over 85 countries.

 

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10:00 am – 10:30 am Break with Exhibitors and Poster Presenters
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Poster Presentations – Presenters Will Be Available

Canadian Industrial Heritage Centre Lauren Archer (Cultural Heritage Specialist, ASI Heritage, Toronto, ON) - Learn to Re-Glaze Old Wood Windows (in 5 Minutes or Less!)Lauren Archer is a Cultural Heritage Specialist at ASI Heritage. Her work focuses on cultural heritage resource identification and assessment, heritage impact assessment, heritage policy development, public consultation and cultural heritage landscape planning. She has a strange predilection for hockey, and its impacts on cultural landscape of Canada. Katie Brightwell (Heritage Cartographer, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd., Kitchener, ON) – Pump that Map Up: A New Approach to Publishing Heritage InformationKatie Brightwell, Team Lead – Cartography, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd (Kitchener, ON) – A graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University and Niagara College, Katie specializes in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). During her 10 year career, Katie has developed a passion for integrating GIS into cultural heritage assessments so that the information is both captivating and functional. Jonathan Castellino – apophasis/pursuing.the.insufficiency (A photo exhibit exploring the emotional landscape of city life)Jonathan is a photographer based in the city of Toronto, Canada. His main photographic subjects are urban and industrial spaces, within which he explores the intersection of architecture and culture, of personal meaning and the build environment. Diane G. Dent & Grant Head (Hamilton Heritage Foundation) - Hamilton Heritage Foundation: Four Decades of EngagementC. Grant Head Ph.D. an historical geographer and cartographer, has served as President of the local branch of the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario, a member of the Board of Directors of the Ontario Heritage Foundation, the first chair of Hamilton’s Local Architectural Conservation Committee, and a founder of Heritage Hamilton. Alissa Golden (Cultural Heritage Planner, City of Hamilton) – Forgotten Faces of King StreetAlissa Golden is a Cultural Heritage Planner with the City of Hamilton. In her current role as Heritage Project Specialist, she is coordinating the next phases of the City’s proactive built heritage inventory work. Alissa has had a hand in a broad range of initiatives from inventory and evaluation of cultural heritage resources to the development of heritage policy. Amber Mandich (Collections Registrar, The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum, London, ON) - Adaptive Reuse in the High-Tech Sector: Heritage Offices and Downtown Renewal Kristy Wells (Assistant Conservator/Assistant Project Manager, Conservation Solutions Inc., Ottawa, ON) – Financing Conservation Projects in Small Towns: Paris Old Town HallOther Poster Presentations (TBA)

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 2A – The Power of Place: Heritage as a Marketing Tool
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Stream: Business and Planning

Speakers

Eve Lewis (CEO and President, Woodcliffe Landmark Properties, Toronto, ON)

President & CEO of Woodcliffe Landmark Properties, a real estate company focused on developing & managing Heritage properties in downtown Toronto.  Founder of Toronto condo market research company, Urbanation Inc., and Toronto-based residential condo marketing experts, MarketVision Real Estate Corp., which has successfully marketed & sold over 22,000 residential units since 1993.

Leo Groarke (President, Trent University, Peterborough, ON) – Downtown University Campuses and Heritage Buildings

Before his appointment as President in 2014, Dr. Groarke, served in various capacities at Wilfrid Laurier University and University of Windsor.  At Laurier, Dr. Groarke spearheaded the development of a new and highly successful downtown campus in Brantford, Ontario, as documented in his book Reinventing Brantford, A University Comes Downtown.

Laurier Turgeon (Titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en patrimoine ethnologique, Université Laval, Laval, QC) – The Spirit of Place: Between Tangible and Intangible Heritage

Laurier Turgeon holds a Canada Research Chair in Cultural Heritage and is professor of history and ethnology at Laval University, Quebec City, Canada, and director of the Institute for Cultural Heritage at Laval University. He has held fellowships and visiting professorships from MIT (2013) and Harvard University (2006). Other Speaker TBA

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 2B – Revitalizing and Transforming Places of Faith
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Stream: Community & Diversity

Moderator: Robert Pajot (Project Leader, Regeneration, National Trust for Canada)

Speakers

Scott Ashe (Heritage Planner, City of Edmonton, Edmonton, AB) - Preserving and Enhancing the Special Character of Edmonton’s Church Street

Following a successful career as a builder, restoring a number of heritage properties in Montreal’s historic Plateau district, Scott entered the planning profession. He joined the City of Edmonton’s Heritage Management Unit in 2013 and has facilitated the designation of several Municipal Historic Resources and leading other projects for the unit. Paul Maka (Heritage Planner, City of Toronto, Toronto, ON) and Georgia Kuich (Heritage Planner, City of Toronto) – From Narthex to Nursery: Lessons Learned from Ten Years of Adaptive Re-Use of Churches in Toronto

Paul Maka, MA, CAHP is a Senior Heritage Planner for the City of Toronto with more than ten years of experience.  As a member of the City's development review team Paul has led the review of heritage conservation projects that range from downtown tower developments to single family homes.

Leanna Moussa (President, All Saints Development Inc., Ottawa, ON) – Remaking All Saints Anglican Church into a Community Hub

Leanne Moussa focuses on mobilizing people and groups to find innovative solutions to effect change. She founded SHO Developments Ltd. and All Saints Developments Inc, social enterprises that allow people to shape their neighbourhood through strategic real estate purchases and development. She is also the co-founder of Prime Ministers’ Row, recently selected as a milestone initiative by the National Capital Commission (NCC).

Kendra Fry (General Manager, Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church and Community Centre, Toronto, ON) - Rural Places of Faith Initiative

Kendra Fry is an Advisor for Faith and the Common Good and the General Manager of Trinity-St. Paul's Centre for Faith, Justice and the Arts, a United Church/Professional Recital Hall/Community Centre/Daycare in downtown Toronto.  Coming from a theatre background (notably Theatre Passe Muraille) Ms. Fry is interested in the intersection of heritage, art and faith buildings in communities.

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 2C – Heritage Conservation Engineering (CAHP Session)
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Stream: Adaptation and Renewal

Speakers

Mike Pond (Prinicipal, Building Science and Restoration, RJC Engineers, Kingston, ON) – Engineering Work on Canada’s Heritage Lighthouses

Michael Pond is a Principal with RJC Engineers, a 70-year-old national structural and building sciences engineering firm. Mike graduated from Western University’s Civil Engineering Department and now has over 15 years of experience with turn-key engineering solutions for the rehabilitation and renewal of historic buildings and structures. Tom Morrison (Principal, Heritage Standing, Fredericton, NB) – Unique Engineering Challenges Presented by Historic Structures

Focusing on building conservation early in his carrier Tom works as an engineer, but with a rare background linking advanced engineering with conservation, real life practice, and a willingness to think outside the box. Tom has worked on a range of unique buildings regularly presenting on engineering and conservation.

Gerry Zegerius (Tacoma Engineers, Guelph, ON) – The Petrie Building Rehabilitation Other speaker TBA

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 2D – Heritage, Truth and Reconciliation: Listening and Responding
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Speakers

Rebecca Jansen (Historic Sites Registrar, Govt. of Yukon, Whitehorse, YT) – Change, Heritage and History: A Heritage Management Approach for Carcross, Yukon

Rebecca Jansen (Whitehorse, YT)- Born and raised in the Yukon, Rebecca is the Historic Sites Registrar for the Government of Yukon. Her work focuses on historic sites inventory, designation, planning and development assessment projects. Rebecca has B.A. in History from Bishop's University and a M.S. in Historic Preservation from the University of Oregon.

Miranda Jimmy (Program Manager, Edmonton Heritage Council, Edmonton, AB)– The Charles Camsell Indian Hospital: Reconciling Our Shared History Janis Monture (Executive Director, Woodland Cultural Centre, Brantford, ON) – “Save the Evidence” Campaign for the Mohawk Indian Residential School Building

Miranda is a proud member of Thunderchild First Nation in Treaty Six territory and has a desire to tell our history in way that honours the First Peoples. Her work with the Edmonton Heritage Council and her community volunteerism all strive to support reconciliation by building stronger relationships through understanding. Other speaker TBA

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 2E – National Heritage Planners’ Forum
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Discussion Forum

(By invitation or request) Is heritage conservation part of the public interest? How do we advance the case for conservation as professional planners?

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 2F – Architectural Terra Cotta Repair at the Lister Block
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Field Session

Leader: Donovan Pauly (Architectural Conservator, Clifford Restoration, Toronto, ON)

This field session consists of a tour of the Lister Block building and a discussion of the rehabilitation project followed by a hands-on demonstration of some terra cotta unit repair techniques. This session aims to give the participants a basic introduction to the material and its use in architecture historic and modern, along with current best practice in regards to the conservation of architectural terra cotta in historic buildings. This session uses the rehabilitation of the iconic Lister block in Hamilton as an example.

In this brief session we touch on the versatility of the material in architecture and provide some technical details of terra cotta fabrication and production methods both historic and modern. The session also aims to highlight some methodologies for the diagnosis of faults in architectural terra cotta cladding on historic structures and typical failures. Traditional and modern repair methods are discussed along with the use of alternative materials for the replacement of failed original terra cotta units in the context of the Lister Block rehabilitation/adaptive use project.

Learning Objectives

1. Give participants an overview of the Lister Block rehabilitation project. 2. Provide basic introduction to terra cotta cladding in architecture. 3. Demonstrate some specific techniques used in the conservation and repair of the terra cotta cladding on this project.

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm James Street North: Renewal, Restoration and Adaptive Re-use
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Walking Tour

Leader: Ken Coit (Architect, Urban Designer and Local Historian)



This walking tour will explore James Street North, home to an emerging arts district and the area at heart of the current renewal of downtown Hamilton. The city’s main north-south street since its founding, James Street is home to a diverse set of buildings representing the social, economic and stylistic influences of the last 150 years. In decline for most of the late 20th century, its unique collection of buildings and streetscape has been recently embraced by artists and the creative industries who are now undertaking the area’s renewal. The tour will discuss the evolution of the street’s recent revival, the stories of many of the small projects and businesses responsible for the change and will visit some of the landmark adaptive re-use projects along the street including the Art Deco Piggott Building, the recently restored Lister Block, and the Beaux- Arts former CN Railway Station, now the LIUNA Station banquet facility.

Price

Free if registered for the Conference

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12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 3A – Spark Session – Historic Districts
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Stream: Business and Planning Location: Webster ABHold onto your seats, this fast and furious “Spark” session brings you nine presentations in 90 minutes. Always popular, watch ideas collide and unexpected solutions emerge as heritage practitioners from across Canada step into the ring.

Moderator: Lloyd Alter (Journalist & Adjunct Professor, Ryerson School of Interior Design, Toronto)

Speakers:

Maggie Holm (Heritage Planner, Halifax Regional Municipality, Halifax, ON) – Barrington Street Heritage Conservation District: Conservation or Revitalization

For the last 12 years, Maggie has worked as a Heritage Planner/Officer for the Halifax Regional Municipality. Maggie has created heritage conservation policy in the Regional Plan, HRM xDesign, and the creation the Barrington Street Heritage Conservation District. Maggie has also created, and administers, two heritage financial incentives programs.

Sandy McIntosh (Senior Project Architect/Urban Designer, Perkins + Will, Hamilton, ON) – Real People & Real Buildings & Real Cities

Helen Cain (Planner 2, Heritage, Policy Planning and Board Past-Chair, Heritage BC)

Helen Cain (MCIP RPP) is a community, heritage and development planner, leading the Heritage Program at the City of Richmond, BC. Previously she worked at the City of Victoria and as a consultant specializing in urban policy, community processes and heritage and culture in the creative and sustainable city. She is currently Board Past-Chair of Heritage BC

Suneeta Millington (Chair, PM Row Initiative, Ottawa, ON) - Prime Ministers’ Row, Ottawa

Suneeta Millington is the Co-Founder and Chair of Prime Ministers’ Row, an initiative that stems from her interest in urbanism, built heritage and cultural landscapes. An international lawyer and Canadian diplomat, she works extensively on global peace and security issues, including the use of city-building to prevent conflict, create resilience and improve sustainability.

Helen Cain (Heritage Planner, City of Richmond, BC) – Burkeville: 1940s Richmond Neighbourhood

Amber Katherine Polywkan is a recent graduate from the Heritage Conservation program of Carleton University's Canadian Studies. She is currently working part-time as Heritage Ottawa's Manager Intern, and spent the past summer as an intern for the Regeneration team at the National Trust for Canada. She has a previous MA in Classical Archaeology from UBC and a BA Honours in History from Queen's University.

Sarah King Head (Historian, Thorold, ON) – Beaverdams: Consideration of a Anthropogenic Biome

Sarah King Head, MA, MPhil (Thorold ON) – Building on a background in museums and galleries, Sarah has been shifting her professional outlook toward local cultural heritage research and conservation since moving to the Niagara region in 2005. A director of the Friends of Beaverdams Church, she is currently pursuing a GDip in Planning at Waterloo.

Nicole Nomsa Moyo (Graduate, Master of Architecture, Carleton University, Toronto, ON) - Organized Heritage: The Challenges and Opportunities in Southern African Townships and Canadian First Nation Reserves

John Terpstra (Writer & Cabinetmaker, Hamilton, ON) - Daylighting Chedoke: Tracing the Path of an Urban Creek.

John Terpstra is a writer and poet who lives in Hamilton. Two of his books, "Falling into Place" and "The House with the Parapet Wall" explore the relationships between built and natural landscapes, and the interweaving of our own stories with where we live.

Katie Brightwell (Heritage Cartographer, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd., Kitchener, ON) – Pump that Map Up: A New Approach to Publishing Heritage Information

Katie Brightwell, Team Lead – Cartography, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd (Kitchener, ON) – A graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University and Niagara College, Katie specializes in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). During her 10 year career, Katie has developed a passion for integrating GIS into cultural heritage assessments so that the information is both captivating and functional.

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 3B – Gentrification & Working Class Neighbourhoods: Understanding Change and Supporting Community
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Stream: Community & Diversity

Canadian cities like Hamilton are experiencing the challenges that come with the “gentrification” of inner city neighbourhoods, including the displacement of long-term residents and businesses. But what role does heritage conservation play in this dynamic? This wide-ranging session will explore such topics as the difficulties of measuring neighbourhood change, the promise that community land trusts hold for ensuring diversity, and understanding the heritage value of working class neighbourhoods.

Moderator: Carolyn Samko (Senior Project Manager, Tourism and Culture Division, City of Hamilton)

Moderator: Carolyn Samko (Senior Project Manager, Tourism and Culture Division, City of Hamilton)

Speakers

Richard Harris (Professor, Geography, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON), Kathleen Kinsella (MA, Geography, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON),

Kathleen Kinsella is a current PhD candidate in the Department of Geography at McMaster University. Kathleen's research focuses on the secondary rental market, and its role in providing affordable housing at the neighbourhood level. Kathleen has also been involved in research projects assessing neighbourhood change, gentrification, and residential mobility.

Sarah Christensen (MA, Geography, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON) – Tracking Gentrification with Google Street View in Hamilton

Sarah Christensen is a graduate from McMaster University with a bachelor degree in Geography and Environmental Studies. While at McMaster she completed a thesis focused on designing a coding tool that utilizes Google Street View to track gentrification. Currently, she is a Master of Planning student at the University of Calgary.

Kathy Stacey (Director, Hamilton CLT, Hamilton, ON) – The Hamilton Community Land Trust: Sustainable Urban Renewal

Michael Ripmeester (Professor, Georgraphy, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON) – Economic Change, Intangible Heritage, Material Spaces and Factory Employment in St. Catharines, ON

Michael Ripmeester is a Professor of Geography. He is interested in landscapes of heritage

Marie-Claude Landry (Executive Director, Héritage Montréal, QC) – Heritage, Gentrification, and the Tensions in Montreal

Active in the non-profit sector for over 20 years, Marie-Claude Landry, a fundraising professional, has worked for the Canadian Centre for Architecture and the McCord Museum, two important institutions, before joining Heritage Montreal. Beyond her extensive experience in strategic planning and fundraising, Ms. Landry is passionate about Montreal, its heritage and culture.

 

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 3C – Preserving Rural Heritage: Buildings and Landscapes
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Stream: Adaptation and Renewal

Conserving rural built heritage and protecting traditional farmland presents unique challenges.

This session will explore such diverse topics as the value of preserving traditional farmland and farm buildings, the repurposing of farm structures engulfed by suburban expansion, and the tension between Conserving rural built heritage and protecting traditional farmland presents unique challenges. This session will explore such diverse topics as the value of preserving traditional farmland and farm buildings, the repurposing of farm structures engulfed by suburban expansion, and the tension between the high cost of small town building restoration relative to income and capital growth.

 
Moderator: Catherine Nasmith (Principal, Catherine Nasmith Architect, Toronto & President, Architectural Conservancy of Ontario, Toronto, ON)

Speakers

Heather Thomson (Manager, Heritage Program, NCC, Ottawa, ON) 

Heather has worked in the field of heritage planning for over 17 years, at the local, provincial and federal levels. At the NCC, she provides strategic heritage advice on federal lands in the National Capital Region, including in the Parliamentary Precinct, the Official Residences, the urban cores of the cities of Ottawa and Gatineau, the Gatineau Park and Canada’s Capital Greenbelt.

Patricia Talbot (Real Estate Management Agricultural Officer, NCC, Ottawa, ON) - A Living Legacy – Conserving the Agricultural Heritage of Canada’s Capital

Marie Voisin (Historian and Owner, Imperial Hotel, New Hamburg, ON) & Don Zehr (CEO, Zehr Group, Kitchener, ON) & Philip Hoad (Empire Restoration, Toronto, ON) – The Imperial Hotel in New Hamburg: The Challenges of Adapting and Renewing in Small Town Ontario

Marie Voisin, a graduate of the University of Waterloo and University of Toronto, is a historian, author and restorer of many heritage houses. Recently she restored an 1872 hotel in New Hamburg, Ontario.  She repurposed the hotel by building twelve senior apartments and establishing four commercial tenants on the main floor.

Matthew Somerville (Heritage and Urban Design Planner, Town of Richmond Hill, Richmond Hill, ON) – Adaptation and Renewal of Ontario’s Heritage Barn Resources

Ella Haley (Executive Director, Langford Conservancy, Brantford, ON) – Preserving Farmland for New Organic Farmers

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 3D – Urban Exploration: Beyond the Aesthetics of Decay
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Moderator: Julian Smith (Julian Smith & Associates, Architects, Huntsville, ON)

Location: Chedoke A

Beyond a pretty picture or an architectural archive, urban exploration serves to educate our life and place within cities. Influential beyond mere ruin aesthetics, it has shaped both academic and artistic conceptions of what it means to live in contemporary urban environments.  While largely ignored by the mainstream conservation community, what can we learn from these rogue historians and guerilla artists? This session will explore the meeting points between mainstream conservationists and urban explorers where a transformation can occur.

Moderator: Julian Smith (Julian Smith & Associates, Architects, Huntsville, ON)

Speakers

Jonathan Castellino (Photographer, Toronto, ON)

Jonathan is a photographer based in the city of Toronto, Canada. His main photographic subjects are urban and industrial spaces, within which he explores the intersection of architecture and culture, of personal meaning and the build environment.

Patrick Cummins (Photographer, Toronto, ON)

Patrick Cummins, Archivist and Documentary Photographer –Patrick has worked as an Archivist in Toronto for over 30 years. For an even longer period, he has been documenting the vernacular architecture of Toronto, as collated in the book Full Frontal T.O. and documented in the film Impermanence of the Ordinary.

Andrew Emond (Photographer, Toronto, ON)

Dan Iaboni (Owner, The Monkey Vault Parkour Training Centre, Toronto, ON)

Tong Lam (Associate Professor, History, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON)

History professorn at the University of Toronto and visual artist. Areas of interest: environment, ruins, urbanism, visual culture

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 3E – CAHP Session – Where Value Lies: Challenges in Heritage Identification, Assessment, and Execution
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Stream: Adaptation and Renewal

Location: Webster C

Explore the challenges and opportunities presented to heritage professionals and practitioners as they attempt to balance heritage value with constrained budgets and real estate economics.  This wide-ranging session looks at case studies on a variety of scales, from restoration and rehabilitation projects, to Heritage Impact Assessments, or municipal heritage policy.

Moderator: Christopher Andreae (Principal, Historica Research, Delaware, ON)

Speakers:

Terry White (Partner, +VG Architects, Toronto, ON) & David Ecclestone (Partner, +VG Architects, Toronto, ON) – St. Michael’s Cathedral Master Plan for Renewal: Rebuilding the Tower & Spire According to Pugin Design Principles and Decision-Making for Interior Modifications

Charlton Carscallen (Manager, CRM Department, AECOM, Richmond Hill, ON) – Common Practice or Best Practice? The Development and Application of S&Gs for Evaluating Heritage  Engineering Assets

Don Luxton (Principal, Donald Luxton and Associates, Vancouver, BC) – Where Value Lies: Rethinking the Heritage Register in the Vancouver Heritage Action Plan

Jeff Feswick (President, Historia Building Restoration Inc., Hamilton, ON)

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 3F – Field Session – The Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Station: Adaptation and Conservation
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Sream: Offsite

Location: Field Session will depart from the HCC’s ground floor lobby promptly at 1:30pm.

Gain insights into the adaptation of the historic former Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo train station and railway headquarters in downtown Hamilton to a rail-and-bus terminal called the Hamilton GO Centre Station.  Learn about the station’s cultural heritage value as the combination of a sophisticated grade separation project in 1931-32, the construction of a train station and railway headquarters in 1932-33, and the sympathetic and successful adaption of the former train station to a rail/bus terminal in 1993.

Leaders: Peter Stewart (Partner, George Robb Architect, Toronto, ON) and Paul Dilse (Heritage Planner & Historian, Toronto, ON)

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 3G – Willowbank: Indigenous Reconciliation, an Evolving Cultural Landscape and a Unique Interdisciplinary School (Part 1 of 2)
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Field Session

 Join Willowbank and members of the Indigenous community for a tour of the Willowbank grounds and building, located in beautiful Queenston, Ontario. The visit will focus on how heritage sites have the ability to be a part of solving national and global issues through grassroots endeavours, one of which is reconciliation with our Indigenous communities. Learn about Willowbank’s new and growing relationship with the local Indigenous community and how together they are rejuvenating the site’s aboriginal layer through the Willowbank Community Love Garden. After, enjoy a light meal where we will discuss the multiple layers of Willowbank and the benefits of creating sustainable relationships that will help Willowbank continue to grow and evolve.As the relationship with the Indigenous community has developed naturally and organically over time and has allowed Willowbank to re-connect with natural resources on the site, they believe that the best way to experience the cultural landscape of this site is through a shared meal, partially produced from Willowbank’s own garden, to share conversation and ideas in a more inclusive setting and experience being a part of a place that breaks down hierarchies and understands that a cultural landscape is necessarily an experienced landscape.Note: This session continues in the afternoon from 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm. See Session 4G.

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3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Break with Exhibitors and Poster Presenters
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Poster Presentations – Presenters Will Be Available



Canadian Industrial Heritage Centre

Lauren Archer (Cultural Heritage Specialist, ASI Heritage, Toronto, ON) - Learn to Re-Glaze Old Wood Windows (in 5 Minutes or Less!)

Katie Brightwell (Heritage Cartographer, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd., Kitchener, ON) – Pump that Map Up: A New Approach to Publishing Heritage Information

Jonathan Castellino – apophasis/pursuing.the.insufficiency (A photo exhibit exploring the emotional landscape of city life)

Diane G. Dent & Grant Head (Hamilton Heritage Foundation) - Hamilton Heritage Foundation: Four Decades of Engagement

Alissa Golden (Cultural Heritage Planner, City of Hamilton) – Forgotten Faces of King Street

Amber Mandich (Collections Registrar, The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum, London, ON) - Adaptive Reuse in the High-Tech Sector: Heritage Offices and Downtown Renewal

Kristy Wells (Assistant Conservator/Assistant Project Manager, Conservation Solutions Inc., Ottawa, ON) – Financing Conservation Projects in Small Towns: Paris Old Town Hall

Other Poster Presentations (TBA)

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Session 4A – Piecing the Puzzle: Heritage Conservation Districts as a Component of Good Planning
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Stream: Business and Planning

Moderator: TBA

Location: Jennifer Keesmaat (Chief Planner, City of Toronto, ON

Urban heritage is of vital importance for our cities – there is growing interest for heritage districts as a planning tool that municipalities can use to manage and guide change in historically important areas. In this session, we will discuss the strategic approach taken by Toronto City Planning in developing Heritage Conservation Districts (HCDs) under the Ontario Heritage Act and with our consultants examine recent HCDs in the downtown core (St. Lawrence Neighbourhood, Historic Yonge and King/Spadina) and how they contribute to a new planning framework for highly dynamic urban areas.

Speakers

Antonio Gomez-Palacio (Principal, DIALOG, Toronto, ON)

Dima Cook (Senior Associate, EVOQ, Toronto, ON)

Richard Longley (Resident & Co-Founder, Harbord Village Heritage Conservation District, Toronto, ON

Tamara Anson-Cartwright (Program Manager, City of Toronto – Heritage Planning/Urban Design, Toronto, ON)

Tamara Anson-Cartwright has 25+ years of experience in developing policies and delivering programs for the conservation of heritage properties. She manages a team within the City of Toronto Planning Division (Urban Design) focused on the delivery of Heritage Conservation Districts, incentive programs, research and heritage evaluation.

Urban heritage is of vital importance for our cities – there is growing interest for heritage districts as a planning tool that municipalities can use to manage and guide change in historically important areas. In this session, we will discuss the strategic approach taken by Toronto City Planning in developing Heritage Conservation Districts (HCDs) under the Ontario Heritage Act and with our consultants examine recent HCDs in the downtown core (St. Lawrence Neighbourhood, Historic Yonge and King/Spadina) and how they contribute to a new planning framework for highly dynamic urban areas.

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Session 4B – Spark Session
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Stream: Community & Diversity

Hold on to your seats! This fast and furious “Spark” session brings you nine presentations in 90 minutes. Always popular, watch ideas collide and unexpected solutions emerge as heritage practitioners from across Canada step into the ring.

Moderator: Victoria Angel (Senior Heritage Planner, ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Speakers

Juan Andrés Bello (Documentary Filmmaker, London, ON) – The Dominion Public Building: A Web-Based Documentary ProjectJuan Andres Bello is a documentary producer with long experience developing content for HBO, The Biography Channel and The History Channel, among other media networks. He specializes in history and cultural heritage, with an emphasis on the use of archival materials for storytelling purposes.

Laurie Neale (Heritage Consultant, Montreal, QC) – Entopia: Our Places in Europe

Alex Tu (Bachelor of Engineering Student, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON) – Architectural Solution to Poverty

Alex is finishing his Bachelor of Engineering in Architectural Conservation and Sustainability, and currently works for the Major Crown Projects in the Department of Public Works and Government Service Canada. Raised in the inner city of Hamilton, Alex became passionate about heritage projects and has since helped with the Connaught Building (HQ of CRA) and many other Federal Heritage Buildings.

Lauren Archer (Cultural Heritage Specialist, ASI Heritage, Toronto, ON) – Hockey as Cultural Heritage Landscape

Lauren Archer is a Cultural Heritage Specialist at ASI Heritage. Her work focuses on cultural heritage resource identification and assessment, heritage impact assessment, heritage policy development, public consultation and cultural heritage landscape planning. She has a strange predilection for hockey, and its impacts on cultural landscape of Canada.

Graham McNally (Principal, Toms+ McNally Design, Hamilton, ON) – Tactical Urbanism

Alissa Golden (Cultural Heritage Planner, City of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON) – Tabula Rasa: Unravelling the Past, Present, and Future of Hamilton’s Jackson Square Urban Renewal Scheme

Alissa Golden is a Cultural Heritage Planner with the City of Hamilton. In her current role as Heritage Project Specialist, she is coordinating the next phases of the City’s proactive built heritage inventory work. Alissa has had a hand in a broad range of initiatives from inventory and evaluation of cultural heritage resources to the development of heritage policy.

Mark Osbaldeston (Author, Unbuilt Hamilton, Toronto, ON) – Unbuilt Hamilton

Mark Osbaldeston's first book, Unbuilt Toronto (2008), was a finalist for the Toronto Book Awards and was the basis for an exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum. His latest book, Unbuilt Hamilton (September 2016), focuses on the city in which he was born and raised. He is the curator of a companion Unbuilt Hamilton exhibit on now at the Art Gallery of Hamilton.

Émilie Vézina-Doré (Directrice générale, Action patrimoine, Quebec City, QC)

Emilie Chazelas MA History of Art, Sorbonne University, Paris).

Émilie specializes in the development of heritage related projects, helping municipalities with their revitalization efforts. She is also the president of the Foundation Culture Outaouais and was the vice-president of the Foundation Villes et villages d’art et de patrimoine. Other speakers TBA

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Session 4C – Cultural Landscapes: Understanding and Managing Change
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Stream: Adaptation and Renewal

Those working to conserve cultural landscapes face the increasingly challenging questions of how to retain their authentic resources and how to balance the tangible and intangible dimensions of these complex places. Dr. Pollock-Ellwand will reflect on the latest thinking around cultural landscapes, drawing on her international involvements. The session will then focus on three case studies – Lunenburg, Royal Botanical Garden, and Vancouver’s Chinatown – that reflect these broader, systemic challenges.

Moderator: Nancy Pollock-Ellwand (Dean and Professor, Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary)

Speakers

Brian Arnott (Learning Lunenburg, Lunenburg, NS), Bill Plaskett (Heritage Officer, Town of Lunenburg, Lunenburg, NS)

A Founder, past President and current member in good standing of CAHP, Brian has been a practicing heritage consultant since 1972. A resident of Lunenburg since 2007, Brian and his partner, Leslie Wright, own, develop and manage heritage properties and buildings of character. Brian recently published “Learning Lunenburg: 100 Ways of Being in a Small Community” and “Lunenburg: Model Town of 1753.”

Jennifer Angel (VP, Operations & Marketing, Waterfront Development, Halifax, NS) - Learning from Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

Dr. David Galbraith (Head of Science, Royal Botanical Gardens, Burlington, ON) – Understanding Significance and Managing Change at the Royal Botanical Gardens

Rideau Canal Heritage Network – Challenges Managing the Rideau Canal Heritage Corridor

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Session 4D – Conserving Diversity: Communities, Stories and Structures
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Stream: Discussion Hothouse

Location: Webster AB

This discussion will touch upon a number of themes and ideas including:

1) connecting story and community with historic place

2) use of historic places to educate and spread awareness of/on cultural diversity

3) role of community engagement in identifying heritage value and developing conservation approaches to historic places

4) importance of architectural, cultural and environmental diversity in urban conservation

5) parallels between biodiversity and cultural diversity in creating resilient communities

6) deeper understanding of place through the interwoven layers of time and culture. Each participant will provide short introductory remarks followed by a facilitated discussion.

Panel Facilitator: Sean Fraser (Director, Heritage Programs and Operations, Ontario Heritage Trust, Toronto)

Panelists:

Jill Taylor (Co-Founder, Principal, Taylor Hazell Architects, Toronto, ON)

Nikki Clarke (President, Ontario Black History Society, Toronto, ON)

Michael McClelland (Founding Principal, ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Holly Martelle (Principal,  Archaeologist, Heritage Planner, TMHC Archaeological and GIS Services., London, ON)

Holly Martelle co-owns and operates the archaeological consulting firm of Timmins Martelle Heritage Consultants Inc. in London, Ontario. The firm is active in First Nations and community consultation.

Fawn D. Sault (Department of Consultation and Accommodation, Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation)

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Session 4E – Conservation Education: Making Connections
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Making Connections

Stream: Diversity

Location: Room 314

Hosted by the National Roundtable on Heritage Education

Consulting, contracting, community work and government practice are all key components of heritage and conservation careers; collaborations between individuals and institutions of all kinds form part of many educational initiatives. What are the examples of successful partnerships of colleges and universities with heritage organizations, industry, governments? Brief presentations that include critical commentary and lessons learned will form the basis of the session, followed by a discussion.

Moderator: Shabnam Inanloo Dailoo (Athabasca University)\

Speakers:

Claudine Déom (Association Professor, School of Architecture, Université de Montréal)

Chris Hahn (Dean, Perth Campus, Algonquin College, Perth, ON)

Andrew MacAdam (Faculty, Carpentry Heritage, NSCC, Lunenburg, NS)

Born and raised in Nova Scotia I am a Nova Scotia Community College Carpentry Graduate and worked as a Red Seal Carpenter in Nova Scotia before becoming part of the NSCC Faculty Heritage Carpentry Program in 2007. I have also attended the International Course on Wood Conservation and Technology with 19 other conservation professionals from around the world in 2010 and 2012 held in Oslo, Norway.

Shannon Kyles (Professor, Retired, Mohawk College, Hamilton, ON)

Miranda Angus (Program Coordinator, Cultural Management Programs, University of Victoria, BC)

Amy Calder (Capacity Planner, Heritage BC, Vancouver, BC)

Amy specializes in cultural heritage, policy and data analysis, sustainable asset-based community development (ABCD), strategic planning, and community engagement and facilitation. She has worked with local and provincial governments and agencies, not-for-profit and charitable organizations, and individuals in Ontario and British Columbia to build capacity for engaging in ABCD and cultural heritage conservation.

Laurie Smith (Program Coordinator, NSERC Create Heritage Engineering, Carleton University)

Julian Smith (Willowbank School of Restoration Arts, Queenston)

Julian Smith is Dean of Faculty at Willowbank, principal of Julian Smith & Associates, Architects, and Past President of ICOMOS Canada. He has particular interests in cultural landscape theory and practice, and the intersection of academic and hands-on training in post-secondary education.

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Session 4F – Hamilton City Hall: Restoration of a Mid-Century Modern Icon
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This field session will tour Hamilton City Hall located at 71 Main St. W, H

Stream: Offsite

Location: Field Session will depart from the HCC’s ground floor lobby promptly at 3:30pm

Hamilton City Hall (71 Main St. W., Hamilton) is a testament to the resiliency of mid-century modernist buildings in Canada and an indication of how the heritage movement in Canada is also changing – it is one of few buildings from the 1960s to receive a heritage designation under the Ontario Heritage Act. Built in 1960, Hamilton City Hall was designed by then City Architect Stanley Roscoe in the International Style. The building is defined by its formal qualities, use of curtain wall and flat roof, and the elimination of elaborate ornamentation.

In 2007 the City elected to update Roscoe’s design to 1) create a civic centre for the amalgamated municipality; 2) improve the building’s energy performance; 3) enable physical accessibility for all citizens and; 4) meet contemporary technological and service requirements. Paul Sapounzi from +VG Architects will lead the tour around the grounds and through the restored and rehabilitated interiors. Paul will share some of the challenges the project team faced during the design and construction process including 1) the relocation of services; 2) provision of insulation for exterior walls and installation of high efficiency systems; 3) upgrades to meet current O.B.C. requirements, including accessibility and; 4) the numerous separate heritage permits that were processed by the City for the project.

Leader: Paul Sapounzi (Partner, +VG Architects, Brantford, ON)

Paul is inspired by the relationship of Canadian architecture and the particular culture of the communities it serves. For Paul, the relationship of a building to its context is as important as its usefulness. He weaves his buildings into their surroundings as if they had always been there and strives for quiet excellence. The majority of Paul’s work has been with high profile, public sector projects. His work consistently demonstrates that the profession has a meaningful place in these communities and that architecture is an integral part of revitalizing and installing pride and excellence into the hearts of communities.

 

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Session 4G Willowbank: Indigenous Reconciliation, an Evolving Cultural Landscape, and a Unique Interdisciplinary School (Part 2 of 2)
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Field Session



Join Willowbank and members of the Indigenous community for a tour of the Willowbank grounds and building, located in beautiful Queenston, Ontario. The visit will also focus on how heritage sites have the ability to be a part of solving national and global issues through grassroots endeavours, one of which is reconciliation with our Indigenous communities. Learn about Willowbank’s new and growing relationship with the local Indigenous community and how together they are rejuvenating the site’s aboriginal layer through the Willowbank Community Love Garden. After, enjoy a light meal where we will discuss the multiple layers of Willowbank and the benefits of creating sustainable relationships that will help Willowbank continue to grow and evolve.The relationship with the Indigenous community has developed naturally and organically over time and has allowed Willowbank to re-connect with natural resources on the site. Willowbank believes that the best way to experience the cultural landscape of this site is through a shared meal, partially produced from Willowbank’s own garden, to share conversation and ideas in a more inclusive setting and experience being a part of a place that breaks down hierarchies and understands that a cultural landscape is necessarily an experienced landscape.

Note: This is the continuation of Session 3G from 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm..

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7:30 pm – 9:30 pm Awards Ceremony and Reception
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National Trust and CAHP National Heritage Awards Ceremony and Reception

Location: Grand Ballroom, Scottish Rite Club of Hamilton, 4 Queen Street South)

Walking: The Scottish Rite Club is a 10 minute walk west on King Street.

Experience the traditions of the Scottish Rite Club which was built in 1895 as a grand family home known as “The Towers” and owes its design to renowned Hamilton architect James Balfour. The magnificent woodwork throughout the building was done by John Hoodless and Sons, prominent Hamilton furniture manufacturers. In 1920 the property was acquired by The Scottish Rite Masons who added the Cathedral portion of the building in 1922.

Join us for the presentation of Canada’s top heritage awards, including the Ecclesiastical Insurance Cornerstone Awards for Building Heritage.

Business attire. Additional tickets are available. A cash bar will be available before and after the ceremony.

  • Morning Sessions
  • Afternoon Sessions
  • Special Events
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8:30 am – 10:00 am Plenary Session – Hamilton Heritage: Rising Relevance, Rising Impact
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Moderator: Paul Berton (Editor-in-Chief, The Hamilton Spectator, Hamilton, ON)

Hamilton is a resilient city with an exceptional heritage legacy that has bounced back from the decline of its industrial sector. It now boasts one of Canada’s fastest growing economies. Propelled by a growing creative sector and a blend of grassroots and public projects, heritage-led regeneration is transforming the city’s urban fabric and creating a dynamic new civic identity. This session brings together a variety of voices to explore this extraordinary rise and assess its social impact. It will begin with a brief presentation, “Hamilton: Reading the Past”  presented by Nina Chapple, former Senior Heritage Planner, City of Hamilton and Megan Hobson, Heritage Consultant.

Speakers:

Keanin Loomis (CEO, Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, Hamilton, ON)

Keanin is the President & CEO of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce. He is a graduate of the University of Waterloo and the College of William & Mary School of Law. Keanin and his wife are proud to raise their two children in Downtown Hamilton.

Celeste Licorish (Philanthropic Services, Hamilton Community Foundation & Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction, Hamilton, ON)

Sarah Wayland (Global Hamilton, Economic Development, City of Hamilton)

Sarah Wayland is Project Manager for Global Hamilton in the Economic Development Division of the City of Hamilton. A dual US-Canadian citizen, she earned her PhD in political science from the University of Maryland. She has worked in universities and conducted research for various government and nongovernmental organizations.

Tim Potocic (Owner, Sonic Unyon Records & Director, Supercrawl & Co-Owner UP Holdings, Hamilton, ON)

Julian Smith (Julian Smith & Associates, Architects, Huntsville, ON)

Julian Smith is Dean of Faculty at Willowbank, principal of Julian Smith & Associates, Architects, and Past President of ICOMOS Canada. He has particular interests in cultural landscape theory and practice, and the intersection of academic and hands-on training in post-secondary education.

Speakers

Keanin Loomis (CEO, Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, Hamilton, ON)

Keanin is the President & CEO of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce. He is a graduate of the University of Waterloo and the College of William & Mary School of Law. Keanin and his wife are proud to raise their two children in Downtown Hamilton.

Celeste Licorish (Philanthropic Services, Hamilton Community Foundation & Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction, Hamilton, ON)

Tim Potocic (Owner, Sonic Unyon Records & Director, Supercrawl & Co-Owner UP Holdings, Hamilton, ON)

Julian Smith (Julian Smith & Associates, Architects, Huntsville, ON)

Julian Smith is Dean of Faculty at Willowbank, principal of Julian Smith & Associates, Architects, and Past President of ICOMOS Canada.  He has particular interests in cultural landscape theory and practice, and the intersection of academic and hands-on training in post-secondary education.

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10:00 am – 10:30 am Break with Exhibitors and Poster Presenters
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Poster Presentations – Presenters Will Be Available

Regeneration Works Coaches on Call

Looking for advice on downtown revitalization? Visit the National Trust kiosk and pose your question to Jim Mountain – one of the National Trust’s Regeneration Works Coaches.

Canadian Industrial Heritage Centre

Lauren Archer (Cultural Heritage Specialist, ASI Heritage, Toronto, ON) - Learn to Re-Glaze Old Wood Windows (in 5 Minutes or Less!)

Lauren Archer is a Cultural Heritage Specialist at ASI Heritage. Her work focuses on cultural heritage resource identification and assessment, heritage impact assessment, heritage policy development, public consultation and cultural heritage landscape planning. She has a strange predilection for hockey, and its impacts on cultural landscape of Canada.

Katie Brightwell (Heritage Cartographer, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd., Kitchener, ON) – Pump that Map Up: A New Approach to Publishing Heritage Information

Katie Brightwell, Team Lead – Cartography, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd (Kitchener, ON) – A graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University and Niagara College, Katie specializes in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). During her 10 year career, Katie has developed a passion for integrating GIS into cultural heritage assessments so that the information is both captivating and functional.

Jonathan Castellino – apophasis/pursuing.the.insufficiency (A photo exhibit exploring the emotional landscape of city life)

Jonathan is a photographer based in the city of Toronto, Canada. His main photographic subjects are urban and industrial spaces, within which he explores the intersection of architecture and culture, of personal meaning and the build environment.

Diane G. Dent & Grant Head (Hamilton Heritage Foundation) - Hamilton Heritage Foundation: Four Decades of Engagement

Grant Head Ph.D. an historical geographer and cartographer, has served as President of the local branch of the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario, a member of the Board of Directors of the Ontario Heritage Foundation, the first chair of Hamilton’s Local Architectural Conservation Committee, and a founder of Heritage Hamilton.

Alissa Golden (Cultural Heritage Planner, City of Hamilton) – Forgotten Faces of King Street

Alissa Golden is a Cultural Heritage Planner with the City of Hamilton. In her current role as Heritage Project Specialist, she is coordinating the next phases of the City’s proactive built heritage inventory work. Alissa has had a hand in a broad range of initiatives from inventory and evaluation of cultural heritage resources to the development of heritage policy.

Amber Mandich (Collections Registrar, The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum, London, ON) - Adaptive Reuse in the High-Tech Sector: Heritage Offices and Downtown Renewal

Kristy Wells (Assistant Conservator/Assistant Project Manager, Conservation Solutions Inc., Ottawa, ON) – Financing Conservation Projects in Small Towns: Paris Old Town Hall

Kristy Wells, CSI Conservation Solutions ULC (CSI) - Kristy joined CSI in 2014, having completed an MSc in Architectural Conservation at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland). She is currently part of a team of conservators overseeing the exterior masonry conservation of West Block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Kristy has particular interest in the conservation of historic masonry and mortars, and has received additional certificates within this specialization.

 

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 6A – Stimulating Downtown Revitalization: The Smarter Niagara Incentives Program Experience
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Stream: Business and Planning

Location: Chedoke A

Faced with the challenge of decline of the traditional manufacturing economy across the region over the past decades, while at the same time experiencing growth in the tourism sector, the Region of Niagara has been investing in downtowns as a means of sparking an economic revival, improving quality of life and tourism potential of Niagara’s 11 municipalities by making downtowns destinations once again. Presenters will discuss their experiences with developing and implementing the Smarter Niagara Incentives program as a tool for sparking downtown revitalization including success stories, lessons learned and how to ensure that the investment achieves desired and sustainable results.

Moderator: Michael Seaman (Ontario Governor, National Trust for Canada, Grimsby, Ontario)

Speakers

Marian Bannerman (Coordinator, Community and Corporate Initiatives, Niagara Region, St. Catharines, ON)

Adele Arbour (Heritage Planner, City of Thorold, Thorold, ON)

Nick Diflavio, (Alderman, Town of Grimsby, Grimsby, ON)

Denise Horne (Heritage Advisor, Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON)

Heritage Advisor, Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON Denise was educated at Willowbank School of Restoration Arts which provided her with two years of experience in practical and theoretical approaches to heritage conservation as well as community outreach. Her work with the Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake relates to cultural heritage resources, urban design and planning matters.

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 6B – Recognizing Urban Indigenous Sites
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Stream: Community & Diversity

Canadian cities have a rich Indigenous heritage with many places of sacred and cultural significance, most of which are unrecognized and unprotected. This session explores how groups across Canada are working to reveal and honour the rich archaeological layers and contemporary Indigenous culture in urban areas.

Moderator: Chris Murray (City Manager, City of Hamilton)

Speakers

Paul General (Wildlife Manager, Six Nations Land & Resources, Oshweken, ON) – We’re Not Hunting on Your Farm, You’re Farming on Our Hunting Territory

Susan Roy (Assistant Professor, History, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON) & Representative from Musqueam First Nation (TBA) – “c̓əsnaʔəm The City Before the City” Exhibition: Groundbreaking Exploration of an Ancient Landscape and a Living Culture

Brian MacLean (First Story Toronto, Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, Toronto, ON)

Rodney Harrison (Professor of Heritage Studies, University College London, UK) - Shared Landscapes: Recognizing Indigenous and Settler Australian Pastoral Heritage

Rodney Harrison is Professor of Heritage Studies at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and AHRC Priority Area Leadership Fellow for Heritage. He has a broad range of experience teaching, researching and working across both natural and cultural heritage. He is currently principal investigator of the collaborative, interdisciplinary Heritage Futures research programme.

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 6C – Adding and Subtracting: Contemporary Layers in Historic Contexts
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Stream: Adaptation and Renewal

Successful examples of adaptive reuse aim to creatively integrate the old and the new. But what constitutes “success”? And what kinds of tensions are we seeing in Canadian communities over modern additions to heritage structures? This pan-Canadian session looks at case studies where the old and the new have been brought together in innovative ways.

Moderator: Christopher Borgal (Principal, GBCA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Speakers

Louise McGugan (Partner, Senior Architect, Barry Padolsky Associates Ltd. Architects, Ottawa, ON) – Ogilvy Façade Dismantling and Reinstatement Project Louise McGugan is an Ottawa-based architect and heritage consultant with 33 years of professional experience. She has been with the firm Barry Padolsky Associates Inc. Architects since 1986 and a partner with the firm since 2001. Louise has specialized in heritage conservation and rehabilitation projects throughout her professional career, many of which have won awards for heritage conservation.

Laura Waldie (Heritage Planner, City of Cambridge, Cambridge, ON) – Thomas Fuller in the Digital Age: The Adaptive Reuse of the Old Post Office in Cambridge, Ontario

Javier Campos (Principal, Campos Studio & President, Heritage Vancouver, Vancouver, BC) Javier Campos is the principal of Campos Studio. Their work has been featured in national and international publications, books, exhibitions as well as receiving a number of awards. He is Vice-President of The Contemporary Art Gallery, President of The Heritage Vancouver, and spearheads an annual series of talks on Heritage.

Steve Kulakowsky (Partner, Core Urban Inc. Hamilton, ON)

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 6D – New Relevance for Historic Sites
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Stream: Business & Planning

Location: Room 314

Canadian historic sites are successfully reinventing themselves in the face of financial pressures and shifting audiences. This session will capture a snapshot of the issues facing historic sites, and hear from a range of presenters on the creative solutions they have come up with to meet those challenges.

Moderator: Robert Pajot (Project Leader, Regeneration, National Trust for Canada)

Speakers:

Larry Ostola (Director, Museums & Heritage Services, City of Toronto)

Jennifer Kirchner (Planner, City of Lacombe, Lacombe, AB) – Strike While the Metal’s Hot: Achieving Sustainability at the Lacombe Blacksmith Shop

Jennifer is the Planner for the City of Lacombe and administers the Heritage Management Program. In her spare time she is President of the Lacombe & District Historical Society and is a dedicated volunteer Blacksmith. Jennifer is also a board member of the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation

Janis Monture (Executive Director, Woodland Cultural Centre, Brantford, ON) – “Save the Evidence” Campaign for the Mohawk Indian Residential School

Janis Monture is Mohawk Turtle Clan from Six Nations of the Grand River. For the past 13 years has been the Executive Director at Woodland Cultural Centre. In 2009 and 2015 took two 18-month secondments to serve as Guest Artistic Director of Planet IndigenUS the worlds largest international Indigenous contemporary arts festival. Currently the President of Kaha:wi Dance Theatre and a board member of the Brant Community Foundation.

 

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 6E – Heritage Conservation and Climate Change
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Stream: Discussion Hothouse

Location: Webster AB

Presented by the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Collaboration on Historic Places in Canada

Conference attendees are invited to participate in a dialogue about the current and potential role of heritage conservation policy in climate change adaptation and mitigation. We invite the exchange of ideas between colleagues in the federal, provincial, territorial, municipal, non-profit, academic, volunteer and private sectors.

Questions to guide the discussion:

What are the challenges that climate change brings to the conservation of cultural heritage resources?

What policy and advisory tools could be developed to address these challenges?

What opportunities exist for leadership and collaboration?

Are there legal, policy or organizational barriers to developing climate change solutions?

The session will be hosted by the Climate Change Working Group of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Collaboration on Historic Places in Canada and moderated by representatives from Parks Canada.

Moderator: Ellen Bertrand, Acting Director, Cultural Heritage Policies, Parks Canada Agency

Speakers:

William Gerrard (Senior Policy Advisor - Culture Policy Unit, Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture & Sport)

David Scarlett (OAQ, MRAIC) (Chief Architect Built Heritage, Cultural Heritage Policies Branch, Parks Canada)

Other speakers TBA

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Heritage Inventories: New Strategies and Tools (Part 1) Offsite
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Location: Lister Block (28 James Street North)

Field Session will depart from the HCC’s ground floor lobby promptly at 10:15am

Heritage conservation is increasingly at the forefront of dialogue around development pressures and changing patterns of urban development. Each municipality faces unique challenges that are best met with unique solutions for identifying and conserving community-focused heritage. Sophisticated and sensitive approaches to managing pressures while preserving social and cultural values are necessary. This workshop is intended to serve as a discussion forum and brainstorming session for heritage conservation practitioners who work with urban heritage.

During this workshop, heritage conservation staff at the City of Hamilton will discuss one of the ways they are responding to urban development pressure at a citywide level, using emerging inventory, characterization, consultation and mapping strategies, as well as new digital technologies, to understand neighborhood heritage in cost-effective, but integrative ways. Following the classroom session, there will be a walk around Beasley, one of Hamilton’s historic downtown neighborhoods that has been inventoried and assessed.

Workshop Leaders:

Sonia Mrva (Curator, Heritage Policy, City of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON)

Alissa Golden (Heritage Project Specialist, City of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON)

Victoria Angel (Associate, ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Angela Garvey (ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Mikael Sydor (ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Beasley Neighbourhood Community Member (TBA)

Space limited. Advanced registration required. A box lunch will be provided for participants. 

For detailed agenda and more information go to http://nationaltrustconference.ca

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10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session 6G – Exploring Barton Street: A Community Grappling with Change
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Field Session

Leader: Walter Furlan (Furlan Conservation, Hamilton, ON)

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12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 7A – Revival Challenges: Balancing Economics and Conservation Choices in Adaptive Reuse Projects
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Stream: Business and Planning

Location: Chedoke A

Those undertaking adaptive reuse projects often face challenges balancing financial considerations with sound heritage practice. What are the trade-offs that need to be considered? What does a successful heritage project look like? This session brings together developers and members of the non-profit community to examine the challenges of honouring place while not losing your shirt.

Moderator: Clinton Brown (President and Principal, CBCA, Buffalo, NY)

Clinton Brown leads Clinton Brown Company Architecture, the full service historic preservation architecture and grant services firm focused on renewing heritage places, attracting new investment and creating new performance. He serves on the boards of the Richardson Center Corp, the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor Commission and Willowbank School.

Speakers:

Robert Zeidler (Senior Partner, Dabbert Group, Toronto, ON) - The Cotton Factory: Developing Hamilton’s Largest Creative Arts Community

Jerry Dick (Executive Director, Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland & Labrador, St. John’s NL) – Finding New Uses for Old Buildings

A native of Leamington, Ontario, Jerry has worked in a variety of capacities in the areas of community development and heritage as: a Main Street coordinator, heritage consultant, heritage inn operator, heritage advocate, director of heritage with the provincial government and most recently executive director of the Heritage Foundation NL.

Harry Stinson (Founder, Stinson Developments Inc., Hamilton, ON) - Reality Break: Practical Strategies & Lessons Learned from 40 Years of Revitalizing Historic Buildings.

Crystal Bossio (Executive Director, Willowbank, Queenston, ON) – Finding the Balance: Economic Sustainability in Non-Profit and Public Heritage Projects.

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 7B – Building Rural Resilience
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Stream: Community & Diversity

Beyond urban boundaries and bright lights, people in First Nations, rural settlements, and more remote regions are having to innovate to stay alive economically, socially, and culturally. To do so, increasingly people are tapping into their wellsprings of natural and cultural “living” heritage that all places have intrinsic to them in varying forms. In many cases this heritage is being discovered for the first time through initiatives such as digital mapping and cultural planning. In other instances, the work of community curators and First Nations knowledge keepers is being renewed, built upon and celebrated through events, performances, cultural heritage tourism, education and interpretation projects, conservation of sites, and developing protocols and strategies for conserving their collective heritage into the future.

Moderator: Jim Mountain (Director, Regeneration Projects, National Trust for Canada, Ottawa, ON)

Speakers

Deb Fleming (President, Texas Dance Hall Preservation Inc., Dripping Springs, Texas, USA) – Preserving the Cultural Heritage of Rural Texas Dance Halls

Deb Fleming, a fifth-generation Polish-German Texan, has logged thousands of miles searching out historic Texas dance halls.  The thrill of discovery and learning, meeting owners, operators, attendees and capturing their stories has been the experience of a lifetime and led her to discover her own deep family roots in Texas.

Lynda Lafleur (Manager, Columbia Basin Trust, Nakusp, BC)

Jamie Lavallee (Director, Indigenous Governance, Law and Policy, File Hills Qu’Appelle Tribal Council, Regina, SK) - Living Skies Heritage Region

Dr. Jaime Lavallee, Muskeg Lake Cree, Director of Indigenous Governance, Law & Policy, File Hills Qu’Appelle Tribal Council. Her focus is on strengthening First Nations through governance. Jaime has worked in Indigenous cultural rights with a specialization on repatriation. .She is the co-editor for: Accomplishing NAGPRA (2013)

Julie Harris (Principal, Contentworks, Ottawa, ON) – Alaska Highway

Julie Harris, Contentworks Inc., is one of Canada’s most experienced heritage professionals and public historians. She has led cultural resource management projects across Canada and major studies for Inuit and First Nations. Julie has a keen interest in strategies that integrate natural and cultural resources in tourism and address Indigenous perspectives and priorities.

 

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 7C – Heritage & Sustainability
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Heritage & Sustainability: Materials, Buildings, Districts - and People

This session will look at the nexus of natural and cultural conservation and why they are interdependent and spring from the same objectives, “Preserving what we value.” Speakers will address the range of scales of environmental and heritage conservation intersections. From individual material durability and single-building sustainability, to entire neighbourhoods, campuses and cultural landscapes, we will see that the “food chain” of scales is all connected within an ecological framework. This framework’s health depends upon human perception and how we as people need to understand the ecology that heritage conservation belongs to, in order to effectively preserve our natural and cultural inheritances for future generations.

Speaker Presentations

Moderator: Mark Thompson Brandt – The Nexus of Natural & Cultural Conservation: We Are All Connected. (Ottawa, ON; Senior Conservation Architect & Urbanist, MTBA Associates Inc.)

MTBA are involved in architecture and urban design projects for significant places with high cultural value and where often the stakes for green, sustainable solutions is also high. Brandt will show ideas from a range of sustainable rehabilitation and adaptive use projects such as the East Block of Parliament; a Lost Village waterfront; a new commuter rail system; the Meech Lake Accord Estate; the adaptive reuse of an old bank building; and even 24 Sussex Drive. He will pull common threads of how we can preserve our planet while we preserve our heritage.  

Speakers:

Suzanne Poohkay Findings from the UBC Renew Program. (Vancouver, BC;  Director, Capital Planning & Strategic Project Development with Infrastructure Development at the University of British Columbia). 

Suzanne and the infrastructure team are responsible for the planning and development of institutional facilities at UBC, collaborating with campus stakeholders to create great spaces for learning, research and campus life. Suzanne has over 25 years of experience in facilities development and  has played an integral role in helping UBC evolve into a global leader in renewal and sustainability, working on a wide range of initiatives including UBC Renew, minor and major capital including LEED Platinum and Gold certified building projects. 

Alan Stacey –  Material Durability & Sustainability – A View from the Trenches (Dundas, ON; Conservator and Owner, Heritage Mill Historic Building Conservation.)  

Heritage is increasingly seen as far more than saving old buildings, it is consistently being linked to sustainability and the green movement.  In reality how sustainable is heritage with regard to the durability of materials and the workmanship standpoint?  As a company specializing in historical woodwork, Heritage Mill HBC often see poor quality restoration work that has prematurely failed despite having been completed within the past ten to fifteen years.  Using various buildings as examples, we will examine why this work has failed, what effect the use of sub-standard workmanship and inferior materials has had on the current restoration process and how we can learn from these past mistakes.

David Waverman & Meaghan Nelligan-Rivard – Sustainability on a Neighbourhood Scale. (David: Landscape Architect, Stantec, Guelph, ON; Meaghan: Heritage Specialist, Stantec, Kitchener, ON)

The most desirable Canadian neighbourhoods are our older historical ones. Observation and research indicate that the key factors contributing to overall quality of life, to the improved physical, social and mental health of the residents and hence their popularity were the sustainable elements and the urban form inherent to the older historic neighbourhoods, in addition to the cultural heritage character. What lessons can we learn from this? How can we use Salutogenic Design and Ontology to help us create these preferred environments? 

 

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 7D – CAHP Session – Heritage Bogeymen: Debunking Building Pathology Myths
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Location: Room 314

Bogeyman (noun) – an imaginary evil monster used to frighten people. This CAHP Session discusses four topics that commonly come up in conservation practices: water; mould; hazardous materials; and life safety. Speakers will dispel the imaginary and help those attending distinguish between real threats and red herrings.

Moderator: Tom Morrison (Principal, Heritage Standing, Fredericton, NB) Speakers:

Stephen Collette (Principal, Your Healthy House, Lakefield, ON) - Mould in Heritage Buildings

Stephen Collette BBEC, LEED AP, BSSO is the Green Audit Manager for Faith and the Common Good, helping faith communities understand their buildings better so to make sustainable choices with their buildings and community. Stephen is also owner of Your Healthy House an indoor environmental building consulting firm in Lakefield, ON.

Carly Connor (Project Manager, Building Science, WSP Canada Inc., Burlington, ON) – Poor Water Shedding

A graduate of McMaster University, Carly brings experience as both a heritage masonry contractor and consultant to provide a unique perspective on the industry and best practices from all sides of a project.

Robert Lovegrove (Senior Project Manager, ECOH Inc., Mississauga, ON) – Hazardous Materials

Judy Jeske (Vice-President, Code, Life Safety and Security, Morrison Hershfield, Ottawa, ON) – Building Code

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 7E – Welcoming New Voices: Strategies for Making Heritage Relevant in New Contexts
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Location: Chedoke BC

Three teams of presenters will share their perspectives on broadening the heritage community, from engaging new audiences and opening up pathways to heritage careers, to attracting the next generation of volunteers. Teams will then respond to practical questions on the transfer of knowledge, creating experiences for youth, and the next generation’s shifting definition of “heritage”.

Moderator: Judy Oberlander (Judy Oberlander and Associates, Vancouver, BC)

Speakers:

Mallory Wilson and Hélène Santoni (co-founders, Vivre le Patrimoine! Montréal Héritage Fest - The voice of the next generation) – Vivre Le Patrimoine! Montreal Héritage Fest Kristy Wells (Assistant Conservator & Assistant Project Manager, Conservation Solutions Inc., Ottawa, ON) & Manja Horner (Toronto, ON) - Six Paths to the Heritage Field Jocelyn Kent (Chair, ACO NextGen, Toronto, ON) – Creating Space for Young Volunteers in Our Heritage Organizations

Jocelyn Kent, ACO NextGen Chair (Toronto, ON), is a second-year Master of Museum Studies student at the University of Toronto. She has contributed to exhibition development and programming for museums and heritage organizations in Toronto and the Niagara region, including, most recently, at Fort York National Historic Site. Judy Oberlander (Judy Oberlander and Associates, Vancouver, BC) – Regenerating Our Heritage Organizations for the voice of the next generation

Judy Oberlander, (Vancouver, BC) designs fundraising, board leadership and community engagement programs for heritage organizations, museums, foundations and local governments in BC, Alberta, and the Yukon. Over 35 years, she has combined theory and practice teaching, serving on boards and working on heritage conservation projects across Canada in the public, private and non-profit sectors.

 

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Session 7F – Heritage Inventories: New Strategies and Tools for Conserving Community-Focused Heritage (Part 2 of 2)
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Note: This is a continuation of Session 6F, from 10:30 am - 12:00 pm.

Field Session

Workshop Leaders

Sonia Mrva (Curator, Heritage Policy, City of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON)

Sonia Mrva, Curator, Heritage Projects, City of Hamilton – Sonia is responsible for the management of cultural heritage resources for the City of Hamilton.   Her prior work includes Curatorial roles at two of Hamilton’s prominent National Historic Sites.  Sonia has a Bachelor of Arts, History and has completed post graduate work in Museum Studies and Cultural Management.

Alissa Golden (Heritage Project Specialist, City of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON)

Aissa Golden is a Cultural Heritage Planner with the City of Hamilton. In her current role as Heritage Project Specialist, she is coordinating the next phases of the City’s proactive built heritage inventory work. Alissa has had a hand in a broad range of initiatives

Victoria Angel (Associate, ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Angela Garvey (ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Angela holds a Diploma in Heritage Conservation (Willowbank), and a BA in Urban and Environmental Studies (UToronto). Since joining ERA in 2015, Angela has been engaged in a range of heritage assessment studies. Her interest lies in how we apply community wisdom and a cultural landscape approach to heritage planning.

Mikael Sydor (ERA Architects, Toronto, ON)

Beasley Neighbourhood Community Member (TBA)

Heritage conservation is increasingly at the forefront of dialogue around development pressures and changing patterns of urban development. Each municipality faces unique challenges that are best met with unique solutions for identifying and conserving community-focused heritage. Sophisticated and sensitive approaches to managing pressures while preserving social and cultural values are necessary.

The process of working toward these approaches, including success stories and cautionary tales, can be shared for everyone’s benefit. This workshop is intended to serve as a discussion forum and brainstorming session for heritage conservation practitioners who work with urban heritage. It will provide an opportunity to share ideas, strategies and experiences from the field and identify ways in which practitioners can support one another during a period of local systemic change and transformation.

During this workshop, heritage conservation staff at the City of Hamilton will discuss one of the ways they are responding to urban development pressure at a citywide level, using emerging inventory, characterization, consultation and mapping strategies, as well as new digital technologies, to understand neighborhood heritage in cost-effective, but integrative ways. This approach aims to be proactive, allowing the city to prioritize efforts and identify a range of tools to position heritage as a vital component of good urban development.

Following the classroom session, there will be a walk around Beasley, one of Hamilton’s historic downtown neighborhoods that has been inventoried and assessed. This field session will include a demonstration of accessible digital tools that can support a community-focused urban heritage study, in order to understand Hamilton's approach ‘on the ground.’

Learning Objectives:

To share knowledge and experiences about: -Contemporary ideas about urban heritage and its renewal (principles and practices) -Goals for urban heritage across Canada -Emerging tools and strategies – what’s worked well and less well -Shared priorities for urban heritage

Workshop Agenda: 10:30am – 12:00 noon - Classroom Session 12:00 noon – 12:30pm - Box Lunch 12:30pm – 2:30pm - Field Session in Beasley Neighbourhood 2:30pm – 3:00pm - Classroom Debrief

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12.30-3.00 pm Session 7G –Field – Exploring Barton Street
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Stream: Diversity Location: Field Session will depart from the HCC’s ground floor lobby promptly at 12:30pm

Barton Street is truly the most authentic and diverse sector of Hamilton. This field session offers a glimpse at a layered area from the Aboriginal footprint, inlet topography, to the once bustling commercial district It will provide insight into a neighbourhood whose built form was designed with people and a public realm as a priority for a society, and where heavy industry, commercial and residential historically have co-existed.

The field session will also tour a window conservation studio and discuss the issues such as the link between the craft person and the academic, or the carpenter and the architect.

Leader: Walter Furlan (Furlan Conservation, Hamilton, ON) 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Break Exhibitors & Poster Presenters Available

Regeneration Works Coaches on Call Kick-starting the regeneration of a historic site? Need advice? Visit the National Trust kiosk and pose your question to Rob Pajot – one of the National Trust’s Regeneration Works Coaches. 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Session 8: Plenary – Vertical Lift: Heritage as a Creative Force Location: Chedoke Ballroom BC

In communities across Canada, the creative industries are often housed in heritage places. But do these buildings offer more than just attractive shelter? Do these places generate a creative energy all their own , an energy that feeds the art itself? This session brings together filmmakers, art impressarios and music producers to explore how heritage places can inspire and transform.

Moderator: Chris Wiebe (Conference Coordinator, National Trust)

Speakers:

Clyde Wagner (Executive Producer, Luminato Festival, Toronto, ON) Clyde Wagner is the Executive Producer of the Luminato Festival in Toronto. In 2016, to celebrate its 10th edition, the city’s annual arts festival is energized by its plan to turn the massive Hearn generating station into a temporary arts centre. An internationally accomplished Producer, Clyde Wagner returned to Toronto in 2014 after an 18 month contract in New York as Senior Producer at the Park Avenue Armory. Prior to joining the Armory Mr. Wagner served as General Manager at the Luminato Festival since 2006. During that tenure he was part of the management team that created the current Festival Strategic Plan, which specified the need to diversify revenue sources and increase earned income. In his role as Executive Producer, Wagner oversees all aspects of production while also taking on responsibility for customer service, ticketing functions and the volunteer program.

Jennifer Jonas & Leonard Farlinger (New Real Films, Toronto, ON) Leonard Farlinger and Jennifer Jonas are a co-founders of Canadian production company New Real Films, which won the Canadian Media Production Association’s Producer’s Award in 2013. They have just released their 14th feature film Born To Be Blue starring Ethan Hawke and written and directed by Rob Budreau. Leonard and Jennifer’s recent films include Gerontophilia, named the Best Canadian Feature at Montreal’s 2013 Festival du nouveau cinema and Trigger, selected as one of the Toronto International Film Festival’s Top 10 films for 2010 and was the inaugural film chosen to open the TIFF Bell

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3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Break with Exhibitors and Poster Presenters
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Poster Presentations – Presenters Will Be Available



Canadian Industrial Heritage Centre

Lauren Archer (Cultural Heritage Specialist, ASI Heritage, Toronto, ON) - Learn to Re-Glaze Old Wood Windows (in 5 Minutes or Less!)

Katie Brightwell (Heritage Cartographer, Archaeological Research Associates Ltd., Kitchener, ON) – Pump that Map Up: A New Approach to Publishing Heritage Information

Jonathan Castellino – apophasis/pursuing.the.insufficiency (A photo exhibit exploring the emotional landscape of city life)

Diane G. Dent & Grant Head (Hamilton Heritage Foundation) - Hamilton Heritage Foundation: Four Decades of Engagement

Alissa Golden (Cultural Heritage Planner, City of Hamilton) – Forgotten Faces of King Street

Amber Mandich (Collections Registrar, The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum, London, ON) - Adaptive Reuse in the High-Tech Sector: Heritage Offices and Downtown Renewal

Kristy Wells (Assistant Conservator/Assistant Project Manager, Conservation Solutions Inc., Ottawa, ON) – Financing Conservation Projects in Small Towns: Paris Old Town Hall

Other Poster Presentations (TBA)

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3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Plenary Session – Vertical Lift: Heritage Places and Creation
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Speakers



Dionne Brand (Poet & Novelist, Guelph, ON)

Jennifer Jonas & Leonard Farlinger (New Real Films, Toronto, ON)

Bob Doidge & Amy King (Grant Avenue Studio, Hamilton, ON)

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5:00 pm - 6:00 pm National Trust Annual General Meeting
Hamilton Convention Centre

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8:00 pm - Late Closing Celebration

Closing Celebration Location: The Hamilton Club (6 Main Street East)Meet your new friends from across Canada and enjoy exclusive access to the historic Hamilton Club, founded in 1873. Enjoy a food and extraordinary video/music installation "Barton Street" by The Tale of a Town.In collaboration with Cobalt Connects, The Tale of a Town has been engaging with the citizens of Hamilton to capture the living memory of Barton St. This presentation melds oral history, archives, cinematography, live music and heart to create an immersive and transportational experience taking us back in time and into the future.The Tale of a Town – Canada is an innovative storygathering and storytelling project that aims to capture the collective community memory of main streets and downtowns across the country. This year the project has successfully completed its three year journey visiting all ten provinces and three territories.A cash bar will be available throughout the event. Please note that only debit and credit payments can be accepted.

  • Post-Conference Tour

SPEAKERS

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Ry Moran

Ry Moran is the first Director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR). In this role, it is Ry Moran’s job to guide the creation of an enduring national treasure – a dynamic Indigenous archive built on integrity, trust and dignity.

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Ry came to the centre directly from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). On the TRC’s behalf, he facilitated the gathering of nearly 7,000 video/audio-recorded statements of former residential school students and others affected by the residential school system. He was also responsible for gathering the documentary history of the residential school system from more than 20 government departments and nearly 100 church archives – millions of records in all.

Before joining the TRC, Ry was the founder and president of YellowTilt Productions, which delivered services in a variety of areas including Aboriginal language presentation and oral history. He has hosted internationally broadcast television programs, produced national cultural events, and written and produced original music for children’s television. Ry’s professional skills and creativity have earned him many awards, including a National Aboriginal Role Model Award, and a Canadian Aboriginal Music Award. Ry is a proud member of the Metis Nation

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Rodney Harrison

Rodney Harrison is a Reader in Archaeology, Heritage and Museum Studies at the UCL Institute of Archaeology in London, UK. He is Principal Investigator on the Heritage Futures research program and Director of the Heritage Futures Lab at UCL.

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He is the founding editor and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology and Vice Chair of the Association of Critical Heritage Studies. He is the co-author or co-editor of more than a dozen books and special guest-edited journal volumes and over 60 refereed journal articles and book chapters on topics relating broadly to the material pasts, presents and futures of anthropology, archaeology, heritage, material culture and museums. He has previously held teaching and research positions at the Open University, Australian National University, University of Western Australia and New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Franklin Vagogne

Franklin Vagnone

Franklin Vagnone is a Public Historian labeled as a domestic-archeo-anthropologist. Over 25 years, he has provided leadership in non-profit management, financial oversight, fundraising, strategic planning, cultural programming and creative place-making development.

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His award-winning work through his thoughtful combination of philosophical and practical experiences have allowed him to consult, lecture and teach internationally for an extensive list of universities, cultural sites, museums and community-based organizations.

Franklin maintains the blog Twisted Preservation, featuring the series “One Night Stand” about overnights in historic house museums. He has also co-authored The Anarchist’s Guide to Historic House Museums, which explores innovative concepts for historic cultural sites. The book, now in its 3rd printing since November 2015, was voted best Museum Education-related book of 2015 by the Museum Educator’s Monitor, and became the #1 bestseller (Museum-related) on Amazon for February 2015.

Clyde Wagner - photo by Jonathan Castellino 2

Clyde Wagner

Clyde Wagner is the Executive Producer of the Luminato Festival in Toronto. In 2016, to celebrate it’s 10th edition, the city’s annual arts festival is energized by its plan to turn the massive Hearn generating station into a temporary arts centre. Working with the prestigious international theatre and acoustics consultants Charcoalblue and the adventurous Toronto architecture firm Partisans, Luminato will build a 1,500-seat theatre, a 2,000-seat music hall and a huge art gallery — as well as restaurants, bars, lobbies and washrooms.

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An internationally accomplished Producer, Clyde Wagner returned to Toronto in 2014 after an 18 month contract in New York as Senior Producer at the Park Avenue Armory.Prior to joining the Armory Mr. Wagner served as General Manager at the Luminato Festival since 2006. During that tenure he was part of the management team that created the current Festival Strategic Plan, which specified the need to diversify revenue sources and increase earned income. In his role as Executive Producer, Wagner oversees all aspects of production while also taking on responsibility for customer service, ticketing functions and the volunteer program. Mr. Wagner studied as an undergraduate at Queen’s University and holds an MBA from the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto.

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Leonard Farlinger & Jennifer Jonas

Leonard Farlinger and Jennifer Jonas are a co-founders of Canadian production company New Real Films, which won the Canadian Media Production Association’s Producer’s Award in 2013. They have just released their 14th feature film Born To Be Blue starring Ethan Hawke and written and directed by Rob Budreau.

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Leonard and Jennifer’s recent films include Gerontophilia , named the Best Canadian Feature at Montreal’s 2013 Festival du nouveau cinema and Trigger, selected as one of the Toronto International Film Festival’s Top 10 films for 2010. and was the inaugural film chosen to open the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Other films include  I’m Yours, written and directed by Leonard Farlinger, Leslie, My Name Is Evil, Up With Dead People and Monkey Warfare, which won a Special Jury Prize at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2006.

http://www.newrealfilms.com

Grant Avenue Bob Doidge and Amy King

Bob Doidge & Amy King

Bob Doidge and Amy King, producers, recording engineers and musicians at Hamilton’s Grant Avenue Studio, have worked with countless local talents and international artists. Located in a century-old house downtown, the studio came perilously close to closing in 2015. But, after a successful crowdfunding campaign, and with the help Gordon Lightfoot and Daniel Lanois, the studio was saved.

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Bob Doidge, owner of the Grant Avenue Studio, began his musical career working with Canadian artists such as Ian Thomas and Sylvia Tyson in the 1970s. Bob and his bandmates Daniel Lanois and Bob Lanois soon found themselves recording artists such as Raffi, Bruce Cockburn and countless other local acts, and so began Grant Avenue Studio. Bob took ownership of the studio in the early 1980s when Daniel Lanois went abroad to work with the rock band, U2.

Bob’s discography as a producer and engineer boasts a long list of artists, such as Gordon Lightfoot, U2, Johnny Cash, Ani DiFranco, Bob Dylan, Bruce Cockburn, Blackie and the Rodeo Kings and many more. Artists trust him with their music and consider him a friend.

Originally from Newfoundland, Amy King graduated from the Recording Arts of Canada Institute in 2002. She landed a post-graduate internship at the famous Grant Avenue Studio. As a sound engineer and producer, Amy has received several Hamilton Music Awards for her engineering and musical collaborations. Amy’s training for a career in music started at the age of five. As an accomplished pianist, Amy has received 15 awards for piano performances, a background which has served her well in working with musicians from Gordon Lightfoot to emerging musicians, area schools and community performance groups.

  • Thank you!

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National Trust for Canada

190 Bronson Ave
Ottawa, Ontario

Hamilton Convention Centre
1 Summers Ln, Hamilton
866-964-1066
info@nationaltrustcanada.ca